HMAS Sydney ii Memorial

Welcome

 

This National Memorial commemorates the loss of The HMAS Sydney II and the ships company of 645 men on 19th November 1941 Inside this website you will discover vital information about the Memorial, how it started, who designed and built it, image galleries of the individual components that make up the Memorial including symbolism, original sketch designs, construction, installation on site and dedication services.

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

The project to build the HMAS Sydney II Memorial was initiated by the Rotary Club of Geraldton. The Rotary club started working on the project, through their HMAS Sydney Memorial Steering Committee on July 1, 1998. The club was joined in its quest by the City of Geraldton, the Shire of Greenough, the Batavia Coast Maritime Heritage Association and the Mid West Development Commission.

The HMAS Sydney II Memorial was designed by Joan Walsh-Smith and Charles Smith of Smith Sculptors

The late Governor of Western Australia, Lieutenant-General John Sanderson, A.C., was the patron of the Sydney Memorial project.

The Memorial was dedicated on the 18th November 2001 and the Eternal Flame was lit on the 19th November 2001, 60 years to the day after the tragic loss.

On the 21st May 2009, The Australian Government announced that the HMAS Sydney II Memorial in Geraldton, Western Australia, had been recognised as a National Memorial

Yes, There are thousands images submitted to Google by visitors to the Memorial from all over the World which can viewed here

Memorial Symbolism

The Memorial to HMAS Sydney II is situated at Mount Scott, Geraldton, Western Australia. In it’s entirety it encompasses the designated site, which comprises the top of Mount Scott. The design incorporates the landscape plan already in place with some modifications. This allowed for extensive low planting of native shrubs, access pathways and a central circular area, which has been designated for the principal Memorial elements.

Purpose:

To design a Memorial of National Significance, which commemorates the loss of HMAS Sydney II, the greatest single tragedy in Australian Naval History, and dedicated to the lost Crew and their families